It’s still writing, but…

Whatever you do and whatever it’s about, no matter how noble or realistic and so on. But I want more, something different, something so resonate that the audience will want to keep on turning the page. One writer replied: I will obey! Another one said: I am who I am. I said, I’ll stick to my guns. And the one who got the job said: I don’t care. But he would learn to…

Try!

A little story she found in the throes of writing her latest manuscript. It was found in-between the pages of her first novel. The content of the note was chilling, freezing her senses. What happened then could happen again. This was the note:

The publisher tried to console me. “Acceptances and rejections come one’s way no matter how the writing is. Yours just wasn’t a fit this time. But we invite you to try again.” I considered this and thought about what they said: Yours was not a fit this time. But they must love my ideas because they invited me to submit again. So, make it fit! Try again. Now, I should write something that suits them and wait and wait and wait…anticipating, expecting. Will my work be good enough? Who knows.

She waited for six months. In the sixth month, the reply came, “Yours wasn’t a fit this time. Sorry. Please try again in the future.” She bit her lip and tried again. A few months later, as she was furiously writing, she realized, what’s the point? And tried someone else, who said, “Good luck in finding another publisher for your work.” But she kept on trying and trying. She revised and revised after each rejection and the piece kept on sounding better. But it always sounded good, she thought. Then one day she came to the realization: should I stop, now? Has this piece does its dash? One more try, she thought.

Fifty rejections later, she is published, but would the cycle of rejection happen again? She put the note away and thought, I got through that. I can get through it again. Not that I ever will.

This is the tale of a writer who made the big time.

Dixon inspires

Author’s note: This article published 2015.

Grant Dixon, a documentary producer and Baptist church member, sees the coming decade of broadcasting on internet as similar to the first few years of NZ on Air. Then, when broadcasting was all new, there was an opportunity for newbies to get in on the bottom floor. When TV3 began, they were willing to take risks to break the TVNZ stranglehold.  

According to Dixon, the internet is now in a similar wild-west time.

Continue reading “Dixon inspires”

Tell a story

I know there is a lot of bad news about, but if you turn on the television news, you’ll get some more. While there is a dearth of good television broadcasting, I am, strangely enough, watching the news more than ever. That is the current events. There is one channel I like, but the other one I don’t that much. While watching that one, I noticed a hidden niche for writers that hasn’t been tapped into that much. While the presenters weren’t telling us about how bad shape America is, they were recycling people’s dirty laundry. I saw the potential for a competitor — positive stories, done with charm and imagination. I know that half the world is in bad shape–but there has got to some good despite the dross? Do something differently positive to the latest fall from grace of a politician.

Continue reading “Tell a story”