Older: Waterworld (1995)

This just happened to be on and I felt like watching it. Turned out better than I thought.

Sometime in the future the world has turned to water because of climate change. Survivors adapt by living off ships and whatever resources they could imagine from this less than inhabitable world, where human waste may even come in handy to survive. How they managed to build ships is left unexplained, but that’s not that important to enjoying an exciting action film, but not something that really touches where it itches, when it comes to current day climate change fear.

Continue reading “Older: Waterworld (1995)”

Is it okay for a writer to change style?

I’ve asked myself this question and answered a resounding no. A writer should have a consistent style. But, if I compare my review of 28 Days Later, written in 2003, to my review of 28 Weeks Later, written four years later, I am resigned to the fact that they have different styles. This is really disconcerting to me, as it shows a flaw. All I can think of, is that a writer may use different styles of writing for a while, then settle on one style. This style becomes natural. In the end, a writer or some, if not many, writers must go through this phase. It’s a natural part of the writing life. One must write to know how one wants to write–and sometimes if not many times this plays out in the publishing world.

The way of the Write

This week has been seeing several devotions sent off to the same publisher, which is a record of a sort, but seeing one I did a month ago rejected by the same publisher. However, two weeks ago, one was accepted for publication–by the same publisher. That is the way of things. The way of the Write. At least this time. And two of the ones I sent were recovered from the rubbish bin, which was pleasing to see they didn’t come to waste.

Now I get it

When one gets all the grimpy I mean grumpy editors, When one has empathy with their predicament, that being having to read through a creed of emails that contain “stuff”, mostly rubbishy contributions (including mine at one time or another), and understand when one faces a similar creed of emails. I feel for you. I understand, at last, why you never got back to me.