Balance

The following was written at another time, for what it is worth today. Still, a sample of life, somewhere, somehow, somebody, everybody. It’s about work-life balance which confronts us today by external events, but this article was written when things were ‘normal’. I’d like to publish it because it’s a piece from my past which I reworked today. I cringe publishing it, but what the heck. I guess these principles still apply.

Work can actually be fantastic and so can rest. Without working, our time away from it may not be as appreciated. Perhaps for someone to appreciate rests and breaks, one has been working and can really appreciate a rest and a break!

When I think of grumpy Monday mornings, when we start the working week, or whatever day one starts, and when we face the fight to keep on working, or complain about work, that is when we don’t really like working and prefer rests and breaks to work. But there is balance between work and rest which is healthy in the long run.

As we all know, breaks are the mortal’s way to rejuvenate. If we don’t break we could breakdown. We can work too much! In fact, there are even laws around how many hours one should be working in a day to protect the health of workers.

One works, one rests. All together in a way that beneficial to the person. And if one can’t work, one may find things to do, and balancing it with rest.

Come down

We all love to engage with technology, but there comes a time when’s enough is enough. Then comes technology come down: the immense pleasure one feels in rest as the senses bend back together again and one’s digital brain falls into oblivion. The simple pleasures that invigorate one’s solar plexus. Coming back from the mechanical, realizing how much energy was drained in engaging the digital binary, the inorganic organ of progress. But later relaxing in days alone not spent in the office, wherever that happens to be. At the beach finding the solitude or revitalization of one’s soul, one gets their organic brain back which inspires creativity and spontaneity. It’s good to get away from technology as a fresh outlook will inspire again and again. A fresh splash of a wave washing over you can do wonders for bursts of creativity just because one did something different to the grind of calculated conformity to bits and pieces.

The computer is arranged and organized in logical fashion, a robotic anti-human programmed to love you, causing extraneous problems one didn’t expect.

But the computer “knows” that the world turns over on functionality, and this is how the computer succeeds, by functioning one step at a time every minute, hour and day.

But one can step outside the digital zone and into the clear. Wonderful, to the end.