Romance

Reading some of the romantic poems and literature that comes out of India, I saw a lot of heart brokenness in the stories, when one’s sweetheart leaves. It then occurred to me that these stories reveal much tender feeling towards love and romance. They way that the love wasn’t tossed into the dirt to be trampled over or thrown into the ocean with a million fishes eager to eat it up. I found the sensibility, the sense that love is treated tenderly, better than many romances that get produced in the English language.

In two-dimensions

In the throes of life, an artist happens to be picturing something in their mind, and wishes to translate that to paper. It may have arrived ‘through the ceiling’ as it was; or in the other words it just popped into their mind. It could come from observation of the real world; a landscape, a person; a thing. But like a camera the artist has a snap shot in their mind of something they want to put onto canvas or in a novel.

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Say that again

This black and white is cold and clinical, but not disturbing. Although confronts us with our own uncomfortableness about it and how we should react differently. Putting yourself in his shoes is the ether dimension, our life was difficult to endure in light of this.  

Down by the river

The Wind in the Willows. By Kenneth Grahame. Year: 1908. Genre: Classic Children’s. Synopsis: Follows the adventures of ‘clever’ Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, and close friends Ratty, Mole, and Badger down by the river bank (based on London’s River Thames), and the animals and humans met along the way, such as the ‘Wayfarer’, the train driver, and the washerwoman. Wonderful book, delightfully told, a masterpiece of children’s literature.

Running in parallel

In “The Wind in the Willows”, a children’s book that’s considered a classic and that I am presently reading, there’s the main action and we find out later what was going on in parallel to that action in a conversational scene. The author chose to tell what happened in parallel in just one scene. I found this worked perfectly, in this case. So, the question I have, is why would an author choose one lot of action first and tell the reader what happened in parallel later on, in just one scene? I think the author must know how this choice would effect the flow of the story. It may flow better that way. By telling two stories at once in parallel may lesson the effectiveness of the story as a whole. You may lose the gist of the story. Parallel plot lines — where two stories are told in parallel at virtually the same time — are the exception and one uses it only for the purposes of telling the story more effectively, without losing the gist of the story.