Compelling

In storytelling class, the lecturer may discuss the concept of compelling choice. For these lecturers, compelling choice is the pivot on which the plot turns in the classical story structure. The main character faces dilemmas at various points and has a choice between two or, even better, more choices of action, but the character chooses one way because the choice compels more than the other possibilities. Real life is faced with such challenges as well at all sorts of levels. I wish that in real life we would always make the best choices, but in stories a character is a character with its own personality, beliefs and ways of doing things. It’s just that some choices compel the protagonist more than others. This is good material for the writer. The character can make authentic choices because one choice was more compelling that the other possibilities. In real life this can be as difficult as choosing the most unselfish course of action.

Narrative / outline

I haven’t done an extensive study on “narrative”, but a narrative is different to an outline or a sketch of events. One of my articles sketches or outlines someone’s career and vocation path, but I wouldn’t call it a narrative. A narrative would have embellished the sketch or outline by providing those things we call color, dialogue, what the person was thinking, the in-depth stuff of the soul condition on the journey, or however one frames the facts with flesh and blood. Narrative must go beyond the confines of a sketch or outline of events. It must substantiate it as much as the “narrator” knows.

Stories that go on forever

Creators don’t like people saying that only 1 episode matters.The creator says, it all matters (They also tell the picky fans to get a life). Scope. Some like their series to never end. That’s true scope. One part after the other that continues the story on and on. The thrill of the chase. Obviously, creators enjoy setting up a narrative, a propelling, never ending scope for their story. It’s the major arc. Creators love the thrill of filling in the detail and working out the finer things that link to the next episode and the next one and so on. Hard work, but thrilling. Creators love series and so do audiences, but a few like the story to finish in one film, book, or whatever medium it’s in. That’s how I see it. 

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