Don’t lozse them!

“Don’t lose those notes,” she told her brother. It sounded like lozse. “What did you say?” The bro could not hear her properly, so he thought. “Don’t lozse the notes!” Oh, he said. “Don’gt lozse the notes, you say. But I have! What am I going to do?” Don’t be sorry if you can’t find them, she comforted. Regret peeled back over his face and sunk heavily on his lip. He regained his composure. Don’t worry, he thought. It does not matter. I wish I had those notes though. Wishing would not bring them back. But, then again, all he needed was one Great Idea.

Nebulous writing

Nebulous writing is without a plan, a shape, a design. Just write. With the thought in the back of the head: think about where this piece, this novel, this screenplay is going. Happens at some stage in a writing career. The fluid recording of thoughts, typed, or on paper, translated into something of a story, a piece, an article, a personal experience related, into a script of some important story. In the end, nebulous writing isn’t nebulous at all, for all writing must go somewhere. I used to be file away everything I wrote, but it became clutter and I discarded quite a bit of it, however I realize that if one is organized or systematic in their recording of thoughts, then any jotting, note, point, image, line, etc. can be furthered creatively into a work of art. Precious notes. Until one’s Magnum Opus Idea is revealed to one’s mind–the primitive, basic plot, the one idea that motivates every story one writes.