Like no other

The light comes alive, as a flicker across the window, the dawn has broken in. It could be any day. But I saw the light today. New Years Day. Like creation sent its rays down into this place. Like a new beginning, a start like no other. Like no other, yes, like no other. A new day has dawned. The heavens did not yawn. The feeling overcome him.

Faith

This sports drama is focused on two Olympic runners. Harold Abraham’s competitor at the 1924 Paris Olympics is the Scottish sprinter and rugby player Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson). Accomplished sprinter he may be, but Abrahams (Ben Cross) has a chip on his shoulder. He has the unattractive trait of smoldering anger, but he expresses his frustration in measure, and to his fiancée, opera singer Sybil Gordon (Alice Krige). His anger stems from how people have treated Jews like himself and his father. In his frustration, Abraham is out to show the world that Jews are the winners and not the losers. On the other hand, the problem for Eric Liddell is that he must run his heat on the Sabbath day, which is forbidden by his faith. However, Liddell says that God made him with the ability to run fast and to not run would be to hold God in contempt. I was impressed by the raising of the film’s central problem, which takes a matter of faith to heart, and one which has challenged many Christian hearts—can a Christian work on the Sabbath? Keeping the Sabbath was a requirement for Old Testament Jews, but is it a requirement for New Testament Christians? Yet, both testaments are in the Christian Bible. I was impressed by how the matter was resolved which shows a Christian running the race of faith.

All right

He held the card and read it,

“Not her again” and threw it in the neighbour’s garden patch.

She was Deborah.

Who loved him,

And sent him a Christmas card, hoping to be his girl.

They were young.

He was fine, she was lovely,

Yet his silence. Yes, his silence was ripping her apart.

And the hurt went deep down inside.

She had a choice, in how she would reply,

To react or respond.

The way she goes could shape her entire life.

Wondering how she would be later on.

And if the same thoughts would still be there.

And if she would be free?

But Deborah stopped by the pavement

And her eyes brightened up.

Singers were there.

For her?

A bit of beauty.

The crisp, fresh, silent night spoke to her senses,

The song on their lips filled her soul,

The people who listened with an ear for hope.

This she knew, would stay, with her, inside her heart.

And the rhymes and rhythms of the night would remind her:

Life goes on.

She clung tightly to the thought that everything is all right.

Moods

The class’s perception of my short story writing was important to me. After all, it would be my first ever feedback on a short story I wrote. After sharing (twenty-odd years ago), one person commented that my writing sounded noire. The piece wasn’t in the noir genre, it only sounded noir, so the person said. Noir or noire is the French word for black. I was a bit confused. This was never my intention.

But I was complimented because I thought my work might have sounded like a thriller of the classic Film Noir. This, of course, is with the likes of cinema’s hard-boiled detective stories. But my story was not truly noir.

The perception that the story sounded noir is what mattered, as the writer is supposed to communicate to the reader something. The reader perceives what that is.

How I had failed as writer, then. Actually, being told that my writing sounded noire, took me off-guard. Yes, the noir or black tone might have been how I was feeling about an experience, which was kind of negative and dark. But I wasn’t thinking through how my writing would be perceived as noir. I wasn’t anticipating it would be seen as black or dark. The reader’s perception matters to a writer and shows me that what I write is always communicating. The medium is the message.

Historic

These would be interesting historical studies: The French Revolution, the American Civil War, the Russian Revolution, the Italian Risogimento, and the Italian Resistance in World War II. Where to start? I would start with the Russian Revolution as this arouses my interest most, the reason may be that I missed studying Russian history at High School and I have become increasingly curious about the subject over the years. That tells me something. But, yes, a bit of history never hurts, something to read, study even, and learn from…when one is able to.