Darkest Hour (2017)

It’s a larger than life portrayal of English responses–mostly political, but also militaristic, personal and public–to the German invasion of Europe during World War II in the month of May preceding the Dunkirk evacuation. Winston Churchill’s reply, as the Prime Minister of England, is riveting. This well-mounted film, with its finely tuned and brightly tempered aesthetics, combined with, as Churchill, Gary Oldman’s flashy, headstrong and transformative performance makes for something quite a bit more than life, which makes it palatable to watch, of what was a real depressing time in Britain. But which touches on the gravity of the moment–their ‘darkest hour’–in some sobering scenes. This one riveted me to the seat. Rating: the eyes have it.

Adding art to a flawed piece

Sometimes, slight sense of irony in a sentence can add color to what would be a pedestrian line of writing and irony can brighten an otherwise flawed expression. It’s simply about the “art of writing” when one observes art in a piece that seems flawed.

Art of writing may be fused throughout the whole, ordinary, unexceptional flawed piece, to give it an air of mystery and aloofness. It is flawed prose in one sense, but how the piece is structured or designed gives an illusion of art through each line. How one does this is tweaking; in sum, making it sound interesting.

What will he do next?

The humble writer or artist and filmmaker for that matter, may shy away from publicity or at least attempt to. But, underneath, there may be a liking to the question, what will he do next? Will it be as good or better than the last thing they made? That’s when a writer and artist gets a little inkling they have made it. But what will be next? A widely received disappointment? After the artist has gained acceptance?