Obituaries

I don’t make a habit of reading obituaries or what is called the death notices, but as part of my reading The Film Year Book Volume 5 (edited by Al Clark), I am finding myself delving into the lives of who died in the film industry during the 1985-86 film year. It’s in these obituaries that we get a good look at how one’s life panned out in the long run.

The book’s obituaries are to the point and informative giving me a solid summary of the cast or crew member who died and many interesting moments of a life.

I was amazed at how the obituary columns came together, as back then the information was not as easy to come over as it is today, with the advent of the internet and what not. Without meaning to sound macabre, the work gone into them makes those death notices all the more special and awe-inspiring. I think I will never look at a death notice the same way again.

Trip down memory lane

I have been seriously following film since when I was a teenager and I like looking back at what was on offer. They call it nostalgia, but I tend to think of it as joy. I have two reasons for reading old film books. One, is to be informed of past films I have missed, or films I would like to more about, or just find new titles to explore. Two, is to choose which films to see. They might be in the past, but I enjoy recovering the old and watching some of them. In terms of the present, I am an avid follower of what is released. At the present time, this is restricted to what is released on the internet. I must admit I prefer following what comes to theatres so haven’t been that diligent in swatting up on what films are on Netflix and Amazon. Some call this Old School–but I don’t have much interest in films that haven’t had a big screen release. As well, I am uncomfortable with the thought that movies that can be played on computer screens can be nominated for Oscars. I guess I am Old School.

Down by the river

The Wind in the Willows. By Kenneth Grahame. Year: 1908. Genre: Classic Children’s. Synopsis: Follows the adventures of ‘clever’ Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, and close friends Ratty, Mole, and Badger down by the river bank (based on London’s River Thames), and the animals and humans met along the way, such as the ‘Wayfarer’, the train driver, and the washerwoman. Wonderful book, delightfully told, a masterpiece of children’s literature.