In the vault

The Film Year Book 1983 by Al Clark

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


A year’s worth of short film reviews from films released in Great Britain between July 1 1981 and June 30 1982. If one is expecting films from 1983, the 1983 in the book’s title is misleading, but convenient for publishing purposes as the 1983 coincides more or less with its publishing date.
The first of a series of books critiquing films during the 1980’s, there are a number of contributors who offer in the way of cutting-edge criticism which can be helpful in assessing the film’s worth. Entertaining bites of criticism that do well in summoning the film to accountability and should provide guidance for the reader. Not so much on the informative side although in each review there are the usual credits and technical details.
Now that the book is forty years old, it is more useful for film buffs interested in that time or want to discover what films were made then. I discovered that the films then were pretty much a Hollywood Babylon with sex, violence, and unsavory subjects, but with the more interesting ones among the mix such as Mephisto, the generally more palatable ones such as Raiders of the Lost Ark and the suitable ones (The Mouse and his Child).
Comes with extended and very well-written reviews of the best films of the year as well as the turkeys and articles about film industry issues then, including pirating of films, the making of the doomed Heaven’s Gate, and a trivia-style article on what the credits in a film mean, among others.
A worthy book of distinguished critical voice that plies out a film’s undercurrents in the longer articles making for a more than interesting read while the shorter reviews are gems. Plentiful mainly black and white photos, some color, and articles of interest to film buffs, which include “faces of the year” and obituaries in warm tributes.




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Does God need us to love him?

Human-like artificial intelligence. Does their creator need to be loved by them? Will they rebel? Photo: Haley Joel Osment and Jude Law in A.I.

A Christian perspective.

A.I. (2001) speculates on artificial intelligence in the future and asks, does the creator need the creature to love him back?

It is an important question for artificial intelligence. In other words, when humans create a new life form, such as human-like artificial intelligence, would the creator need to be loved by this new life form?

A.I. even goes one step further: try to understand artificial intelligence by going back to the start, with the Creator, God. Does the Creator need his creatures to love him?

Then, do the creatures that humans create, such as David, need to be loved back, as they have this intrinsic need to be loved?  

The A.I. David hopes the “Blue Fairy” (a character in the book Pinocchio) will grant him his wish of being loved. David will have to become a real boy, loved because he is a real boy, so it takes him on a journey through the “new earth” to find what he is looking for.

But go back to the start, with the original Creator. Does God have a need? Is God needy? Did God create humans out of need? Does God really need humans to love him? Does the self-sufficiency of God beg the question that he does not need?

I think this goes to the very heart of God. The Bible says that God is love so in his heart is pure love for his creatures. God will love irrespective of getting love back from his creatures. God goes on loving. So, is A.I. asking the right question, that God has a need? It is one of those tricky theological questions again, but God is. In the Bible, God is the I AM. The Alpha, the Omega, the beginning, and the end. Not how much we love God back, but how much God loves us—this is the undeniable fact of his love for us.

We can love our “creatures” like this, with care.

Natural selection?

What’s natural for me to write about or give a message on may not be natural to a hearer of mine. Circa 2001. All those years ago…Selection of material at whim, or selection of material by design is the lesson.

Center

Spirituality is subjective. Christian spirituality would have to be centered on Jesus Christ, but cannot be about “who is Jesus for you”, as therefore Jesus could be anybody who fits your description of Jesus and not the gospel’s.

There can be many spirits, but only one Spirit from Jesus Christ. There can be many false Christs, but only one Christ from history, who can reveal himself to us today–the only true Jesus Christ as shown to us in the gospel. The question to our spirituality, from which Christian spirituality flows, is do we believe in this Christ?

Ahead

Time is not managed where I am. It’s more that that. Time is the price for not getting things done. That’s when time is a headache. Conversely, time is the vehicle for getting things done, but it is going to run out and I am going to get older. But if one still thinks one has time on their side, time is about looking ahead optimistically.