Jesus: known or obscure?

In a brilliant film, Van Gogh, in At Eternity’s Gate (2018), says Jesus became known thirty years after his death. Before then Jesus was obscure, he says. I have a problem with this.

The gospels says about Jesus is that he was well-known to the people during his lifetime, and known soon after his lifetime, as Jesus’ message and Spirit spread immediately after his death and resurrection.

One of things that get overlooked at times, is that the gospel narratives and the story of the early church in Acts are reliable.

It may sound like one of those disagreements Van Gogh and Gaugin had in this movie–but this is me, a viewer, disagreeing with what Van Gogh says. Sounds strange, but it’s the point of view here I’m pointing to that’s a problem, not the movie itself.

Would facing mortality change anything?

If one struggles with identity and individuality, one may take on a persona, a performance, an image of somebody. Then having shown the world an identity, one faces their mortality and starts to asks if what they believed is true. Would facing mortality make a difference to how one saw one’s self? How one believed in one’s self? Would an element of self-doubt or belief creep in, as one realizes that facing mortality can change everything one believed?

What reaction would Jesus get today?

When I read the passage from the gospel of Luke, chapter thirteen verses 1-5, I wonder if anyone today would talk like Jesus did in that passage. Sure, some may, but not in the kind of way Jesus would.

Jesus had the best, if not perfect way of putting something. Sure, it would get a reaction, but Jesus knew how to put his message aptly. He would say it just as it should be said, just as the sender of the message intended it, no missing links, or showing up falsities. Jesus knew how to say things.

So, if Jesus talked about the matter of sin today, I wonder what reaction he would get?