Losing religion?

Too much of a good thing? When there is so much grace that one does whatever they feel like. Freedom. I went to go to a ‘contemporary’ church, much on a whim rather than thought-through, which was not into religion or religious people. Someone there, seemingly not concerned, yelled at me when I did not do as she expected in her group. Human nature, I guess. But is it also a belief? God graces me, so I am entitled to treat someone ungraciously, even when it is a mistake? I guess you could feel justified in losing your temper if you have lost religion and got grace. At wit’s end, eh? But should not grace wind you up to better responses? Being gracious, for example.

Continue reading “Losing religion?”

Love

The following verse guides and challenges me and points to where to find a better world, better places, and better state of being. It links in to today’s posts as well, in that “to live a life of love” (2 John 6, in the Bible), in which no harm is done to one’s neighbour, then one doesn’t commit adultery, or kill, and any other violation against another human being, and one can even reach the marginalized, because one is acting in love. I find the verse challenges and guides me at the spiritual level, to do as it says in my life and to consciously apply it. The real challenge is when one goes beyond one’s comfort zone by serving and befriending others who need it. Yet God sees the heart of the willing servant and does not discredit that. And there are more people more skilled than you and me who are up to that kind of service. As we all have our own gifts, this or that, which can be dispensed with an attitude and application of love for neighbour.

Eternity

Eternity is the next life. It is so real that I think God ingrained it in the cosmos and universe as a reflection of the eternal dimension. Why am I writing about eternity? Because eternity is mentioned in the film At Eternity’s Gate (2018) which is my film of the week. I try to get the most out of films when I watch them, so At Eternity’s Gate, as the title suggests, offered eternity as a theme, among a complexity of other themes and shades. Eternity is referenced in the film, twice if I remember rightly. Once, Van Gogh says he’s thinking about his relationship to eternity, and when someone asks him, what’s eternity, and Van Gogh replies it’s the next life. It’s a religious statement, but also a profound statement: “The next life”. I love that. The next life. Life that goes on and on. Beauty. Loveliness. Bliss. Forever Paradise. Van Gogh believed in beauty and saw it in nature and waited for it in the everlasting life. Everlasting or eternal life is the opposite of death for eternity. Eternal life or life for eternity all comes down to pure life: and life is positive.

Jesus: known or obscure?

In a brilliant film, Van Gogh, in At Eternity’s Gate (2018), says Jesus became known thirty years after his death. Before then Jesus was obscure, he says. I have a problem with this. The gospels says about Jesus is that he was well-known to the people during his lifetime, and known soon after his lifetime, as Jesus’ message and Spirit spread immediately after his death and resurrection. One of things that get overlooked at times, is that the gospel narratives and the story of the early church in Acts are reliable. It may sound like one of those disagreements Van Gogh and Gaugin had in this movie–but this is me, a viewer, disagreeing with what Van Gogh says. Sounds strange, but it’s the point of view here I’m pointing to that’s a problem, not the movie itself.