Afterwards

The Road to Hell: Everlasting Torment or Annihilation? by David Pawson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Road to Hell ends with the words, “on which sober note we conclude our study”, referring to the author’s statement that those whose names are not in the Lamb’s book of life will suffer torment with the fallen angels in hell, quoting the book of Revelation from the Bible. David Pawson’s The Road to Hell does have that kind of tone at times: a shot to the heart. Yet, The Road to Hell is other things as well. Challenging one out of complacent thinking and living so to avoid the dangers of hell as well as comforting one with thoughts of heaven and grace. Pawson is adamant, however. Getting to heaven is not by ‘cheap grace’ where one can do as they please while still being under God’s grace, but by continuing in the faith in Jesus, not disowning him, and renouncing one’s sins. Hell is a step away with complacency, but Pawson in his gentle manner encourages due diligence in the faith, although a small few of his statements may seem blunt if not preachy, however, one gets the impression in that there are not as many words to always deliver eloquently such an urgent message to Christians and non-believers.

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Drifted

I was alone when it happened.

But I felt a calm around me.

As if taking this pain without feeling a thing

I was in the East that day, in the middle of the world.

It was sunny, on a river, and I was standing in my paddle boat.

There I was chased by unknown bodies, vaguely resembling figures,

They had a shape,

But no form

The arrows they shot at me flew by and I laid low.

And paddled my boat to a bamboo dwelling, where I hid.

A thatched house.

Those accusers would not find me there, my thoughts.

I paused for a moment as the figures went away.

Around the corner, they vanished.

Some arrows got me.

I felt long arrow shafts moving down my chest,

At the same time, I saw arrowheads protruding.

And the arrows I saw were removed, almost supernaturally, as if the wind blew them away.

I felt no pain.

Regaining strength, I saw yet again my pursuers who were waiting for me, my thoughts.

And the river looked kind as I watched it appear before my eyes, thanking providence.

A man I recognized as he came beside me. He was my friend.

An older man, wearing a robe, and with beard.

Light in spirit,

Lighter than anyone I knew.

As if he could be carried,

But he carried me by his spirit,

As we travelled by boat to an unknown destination.

To get away from those thoughts,

Which brought me no pain,

But only worry.

My friend gave me great comfort in the days ahead.

I forgot about my attackers and neither did they come.

The days came and went, and I drifted away down the river, with my friend by my side.

I was glad. For we disappeared into the mist, and I was at rest from those thoughts.

Tried

I didn’t consider every publication, but I would have liked to. I think I almost did. It felt like it at times. With all that leg work, or my fingers doing the walking as I combed those writer’s guides. But although some were lucrative, and I could have made an effort to ‘cater to the market’, many would not fit in with me.

Contribute?

Contribute? It never crossed my mind. They told me it is beneficial to research the market because I would understand the publication and what I could offer it, how I could contribute. But that’s if there were suitable publications. I fitted in quite well after all.

Lost in space?

* * *

Corporeal flesh courtesy of an ever-growing alien looking for its next meal and corporate shenanigans which is sneakily inserted into the story, in this out of their depth space movie set on a commercial cargo ship — the crew which find themselves in uncharted terrain is played by Tom Skerrit, Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt, Ian Holm, and Yaphet Kotto.

The ship is heading back to earth, unbeknown to them what will lie ahead as they make an unexpected stop off, awaiting is an alien lifeform.

Life has its unexpected twists and turns, and decisions are made for whatever reason, some have agendas to pull others in, others just tag along thinking it is business as usual. Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) has the instincts to know better than respond to the SOS message that will inevitably lead them to the alien (they do not know this, but the audience probably does) but no one on the crew will listen especially the creepy little scientist (Ian Holm) who Ripley is suspicious of.

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