The hole in the plot

How does one make a story, such as a film story, look great? By covering up any holes in the plot. What one can do is hide the imperfections in such a way that no one would notice at all, on reading the story or watching the film.

I have seen a film countless times so know it inside out. But one day, it somehow occured to me that something didn’t fit, but it didn’t occur to me on watching this film, but on reading the screenplay. As I never noticed this hole in the plot on watching the film, this hole was better concealed than other films that hide their imperfections poorly.

I saw on reading the screenplay that the flaw was cleverly disguised. At the mid-may point, one would see the hole in the plot, if one could recall a certain fact of the story one hour earlier. Since so much has gone on since then, how would one remember? The hole is cleverly concealed by having filled up the story with other things.

Maybe reading the screenplay of the film has a way of clearing up the details. The hole was so great that I had a hard time reconciling the problem with my liking of the film. Had I been duped? Deceived? Mis-led? Maybe, probably. Noticing holes in the plot does spoil a film experience, but since I didn’t see the plot hole on watching the film, it doesn’t matter.

Nevertheless, a plot hole can cause the fan to think about the implications of the hole to the wider story, which may be interesting. What would it say about characters, a species, a group, a planet etc. Maybe the hole is deliberate as it accentuates something else the writer is wanting to convey.

But as I thought about this so-called plot hole, I saw how it couldn’t be there, that there was an explanation. So, there one has it: never judge a hole by its cover.

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